Thursday, Oct 23rd

Last updateFri, 17 Oct 2014 9am

You are here: Home More... Speak Your Mind Why TIPEEG makes sense

Why TIPEEG makes sense

David Nuyoma, CEO of the Development Bank of Namibia, discusses opportunities for entrepreneurship through public tenders.
Public procurement and the tendering process has jump-started many economies, and the same can be true for TIPEEG if entrepreneurs use the opportunities in a responsible manner.
In the course of 2011, public tenders became a matter of heated discussion in the public domain. These discussions centred on the shortcomings associated with the processes and other aspects related to the provision of services through public tender.
The debate also relates to the expectations of government policy through the Targeted Intervention Programme for Employment and Economic Growth (TIPEEG).
It is my view that it is time to look at this policy pronouncement as an opportunity to develop our country, and to provide much-needed infrastructure especially in poorly developed areas. We should also look at it as an opportunity for participation by those who wish to become entrepreneurs and meaningfully participate in the construction and development of our country.
TIPEEG is an opportunity that we should embrace responsibly and in an accountable manner. Countless countries that have taken advantage of public procurement systems were able to develop domestic industries, to supply goods and services and develop the necessary infrastructure for basic services such as schools, health facilities, roads and other public amenities as a result.
Market access is a key requirement for a successful business. Though it may sound basic, it is something that should not be taken for granted. Quite often, in fact, those in business have found it to be one of the most elusive elements.
The public procurement system provides a ready market, but for the system to work, those who participate in it should recognise that it requires responsibility and accountability.
Obtaining a public tender or contract should not be taken lightly. It should be seen as a privilege, as what is at stake is meeting the demand, and bridging shortfalls and backlogs, in the provision of goods and services, as well as developing infrastructure for society. So the aspects of quality and timely delivery are essential elements of public procurement.
The implication of taking short cuts - on quality and delivery - is delayed progress. This places a burden on society as people end up waiting and paying more for basic services. Imagine the damaging effect shoddy work and resultant delays have on communities in outlying areas in need of a clinic, for example. The same goes for the construction of roads and schools.
Getting a chance to participate in the public procurement process should never be viewed as an opportunity to get rich quickly, but rather as an opportunity to contribute meaningfully to societal development.
Naturally, there is benefit for the entrepreneur. With participation in public tenders, comes the opportunity to build up an asset base which is particularly important for emerging entrepreneurs. It is an opportunity to create wealth in a sustainable and meaningful way.
The profits derived from this opportunity should be applied wisely and reinvested in expansion and should help embed businesses that otherwise would have difficulty finding markets and that may end up having very short life spans.

Articles In This Category
Speak your mind
David Nuyoma, CEO of the Development Bank of Namibia, discusses opportunities for entrepreneurship through public tenders. Public procurement and the...
Speak your mind
The ministry of Education is calling for a complete overhaul of the current education system. The new curriculum will be full swing by 2050. The new...
Speak your mind
Dear Editor The Ohangwena II aquifer with its huge,  ancient and pure water reserves found in Owambo has the potential to make this region not...
Speak your mind
Dear Sir, NAPA has, over the past 21 months, made every effort to avoid industrial action. Air Namibia management has had every opportunity, in the...
Speak your mind
The unfortunate circumstances surrounding the death of Fortuna Tenete in a Wanehada police holding cell made newspaper headlines this week with many...
Speak your mind
SWAPO Party Youth League (SPYL) has noted, with high degree of tremor, that despite the fact that Namibia, a small population state, is scandalously...
Speak your mind
Against the background of the SADC Regional Infrastructure Investment Conference in Maputo next week, Gerhard Erasmus, a tralac associate, discusses...
Speak your mind
Our National Broadcaster is blowing its own trumpet on its Digital Terrestrial Televison (DTT) transition, a form of technological evolution of...
Speak your mind
This year Namibia has dropped further down the Global Competitiveness Rankings to 92nd out of 144 countries surveyed. The Global Competitiveness...
Speak your mind
Phineas struggles to contain his disappointment as the rains continue to pour down with no end in sight. He strategically places his last bucket...
Related Articles
Columns
The public conduct of our local artists has come under scrutiny recently amidst reports of physical violence. Hip-Hop artist and Artist of the Year,...
Sport
Paddy Murphy retained his title as overall winner of the ultra FNB Desert Triathlon, showing again why he is a world class athlete. He completed the...
Columns
Background In the previous article I discussed the definition of innovation and compared it to other terms like “invention” and “creativity”....
Columns
This week my heart bled for yet another family that has to bury their young daughter after she was brutally raped and killed and left in a veld near...
Columns
Namibian marketing managers seem to stay away from social media as they are afraid people will say bad things about them. But is pretending social...
Latest Articles
Headlines
The winner of the Best Business Idea competition run by the Economist Businesswomen Club after their Businesswomen Conference in Ongwediva, was...
Headlines
The most discredited agricultural commodity, ostriches, are back on the farming radar after the Ministry of Trade and Industry, in collaboration with...
Editors Desk
Can one imagine how unmanageable the Namibian capital market would be if yields on government bonds came down by 11% on one day, only to jump up more...
17 October 2014 (35 hits)
Weather
What Happened? The layered atmospheric sandwich that started developing last week continued up to Wednesday this week at which point the last...
Headlines
The City of Windhoek commemorated World Food Day yesterday at Otjomuise. This is the first ever commemoration of the World Food Day in Windhoek and...